Climate Change · Environment · population control · overpopulation · Africa

Killing Africa – Evil in the name of Good

In my upcoming book I will use Africa as the “poster child” to illustrate the evil that is being continued against the developing world in the name of good. The modern Environmental movement, including Climate Change, is closely associated with and grew out of the overpopulation myth started in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the Population Control… Continue reading Killing Africa – Evil in the name of Good

but is it science

Amnesty Report: Green Battery Technology Built on a Foundation of Child Abuse

Watts Up With That?

Child Cobalt Miners in Kailo, Congo - Author Julien Harneis, source Wikimedia. Child Cobalt Miners in Kailo, Congo – Author Julien Harneis, source Wikimedia.

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Amnesty International has released a shocking report, about conditions in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the child labourers who mine much of the world’s Cobalt. Cobalt is an essential component of modern high capacity batteries, such as the batteries which power laptops, cell phones and electric cars.

The introduction of the report;

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO: “THIS IS WHAT WE DIE FOR”: HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO POWER THE GLOBAL TRADE IN COBALT

This report documents the hazardous conditions in which artisanal miners, including thousands of children, mine cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It goes on to trace how this cobalt is used to power mobile phones, laptop computers, and other portable electronic devices. Using basic hand tools, miners dig out rocks…

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but is it science

Child miners aged four living a hell on Earth so YOU can drive an electric car: Awful human cost in squalid Congo cobalt mine that Michael Gove didn’t consider in his ‘clean’ energy crusade

Watts Up With That?

From The Daily Mail

  • Sky News investigated the Katanga mines and found Dorsen, 8,
    and Monica, 4
  • The pair were working in the vast mines of the Democratic Republic
    of Congo
  • They are two of the 40,000 children working daily in the mines,
    checking rocks for cobalt

By Barbara Jones for The Mail on Sunday

Published: 17:01 EDT, 5 August 2017 | Updated: 08:37 EDT, 6 August 2017

Picking through a mountain of huge rocks with his tiny bare hands, the exhausted little boy makes a pitiful sight.

His name is Dorsen and he is one of an army of children, some just four years old, working in the vast polluted mines of the Democratic Republic of Congo, where toxic red dust burns their eyes, and they run the risk of skin disease and a deadly lung condition. Here, for a wage of just 8p a day, the children are…

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